5 Weight Loss Myths You Probably Believe

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weight loss myths you believed

When you hear something enough, you start to believe it. Even if there’s a voice inside of your bulbous melon screams  at you not to believe something so obviously phony that you’d be a moron to believe it, somehow you wind up conning yourself into thinking it’s true. Case in point — our palms are not hairy and we have not gone blind. (You were wrong, Monsignor McHugh!)

Also Read: 7 Myths About Exercise

Still, some myths simply refuse to go away no matter how many times they’re debunked. And weight loss has more than a few whoppers out there. (Pun unintentional, we swear.) So as you ready to shed excess poundage for the New Year to earn that summer body to put on display at the nude beach this summer, keep in mind these five weight-loss myths …

#1. RAPID WEIGHT LOSS IS A TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD THING
Crash diets are bad because they can lead to nutritional deficiencies and mess with your sunny disposition. But rapid weight loss doesn’t have to be unhealthy. “As long as you aren’t starving yourself and you’re taking in an adequate amount of protein, eating 10 servings of veggies a day, and taking in the right kind of fat you’ll not only lose weight fast, but you’ll be healthier, too,” says Lisa Lynn, a specialist in metabolic disorders and the author of The Metabolism Solution.

Lynn also points out that when you can see results happen quickly you’re less likely to ditch the program. “The secret lies in knowing exactly what your body needs to stay healthy, as well as eating quality foods.”

And no, the “quality foods” list does not include Choco Tacos or deep fried lard balls.
#2. GOVERNMENT SERVING SIZES ARE ACCURATE
Wait, the government bends the truth? Nice try. That’d never happen, ugh, … okay, we believe it.

“If you follow what the government suggests you’re guaranteed to have a weight problem,” she warns. “Plus, serving size and portion are not the same things.”

Turns out, serving sizes are universal. Which, now that we think about it, makes absolutely no sense at all.

“Anyone can figure out that a 6′ male needs more food than a 5’5″ male. So guess what happens? The guy who’s 5’5″ gains weight. So if you’re not losing weight, the serving sizes you’re consuming might be to blame — even if your weighing your food. Try eating half as much and you’ll lose weight faster due to the calorie correction.”